Manajemen Swadaya pada pengembangan Infrastruktur Pedasaan


Manajemen Swadaya pada pengembangan Infrastruktur Pedasaan

Peran syadaya masyarakat dalam pembangunan pedesaan cukup tinggi dalam peningkatan pembangunan infrastruktur pedesaan dimana banyak hal yang menjadikan bantuan pemerinath mendapatkan dukungan swadaya masyarakat yang tidak optimal. Mengapa? Karena manajemen yang kutrang tepat dan efektif serta efisien. Namun apabial swadaya masyarakat berupa dukungan bantuan tenaga kerja swadaya masyarakat kalau tidak diletakkan pada temapatnya justru menjadikan persolan penting dimana ada 2 tenaga kerja dlam satu proyek atau program dimana :
1. Tenaga kerja upahan
2. Tenaga kerja swadaya.
Dimana tenaga kerja upahan kalau tidak berdasarkan standar nasional yang baikpun akan mengurangi kalitas bangunan dan pemebngakkan biaya. Pembengkakan biaa ini akibat oleh tenaga kerja yang belum diorganisir dengan cepat.
Yang banayk menjadikan perhatian penulis adalah dimana kapan swadaya itu dilakukan harus melakukan prosedur kerja yang benar berupa waktu, tempat dan saat yang tepat. Dimana :
1. Swadaya dilakukan dengan asumsi semua orang bisa melakukan tanpa tenaga khusus atau keahlian khusus.
2. Dapat dilakukan dalam waktu liuang.
3. Tidak memunculkan kecemburuan sosial.
Misalnay apabilapembangunan jalan berbeton akan bagus swadaya bila semua dilakukan swadaya sampai hamparan medanjalan diswadayakan dengan benar berupa perataan, pengedukan dan pengarukan. Baru tenaga kerja yang merupaka n tenaga kerja upahan adlah melakukan pekerjaan dengan cepat dan tepat waktu sehingga kualitas tetap tinggi, bahkan ada pengembangan kualitas dan kuantitas.
Misalanya untuk pembuatan sender irigasi, seharusnya swadaya pada pembuatan blok dan perataan hamparan irigasi, baru tenaga kerja upahan adalah langsir dan pemasangan blok, sehingga tidak ada pembengkakan biaa sehingga bisa jadi bangunan tidak selesai dan tidak tercapai volumenya.

Finding a Rhythm as an Entrepreneur With a Family


David Cummings on Startups

Several weeks ago a young professional that wants to be an entrepreneur approached me for advice about being an entrepreneur and having a family. He had just had his first child and was looking for ideas. Having spent time thinking through this I offered up a fews ideas:

  • Write down a set of rules and guidelines and share them with your spouse (getting everyone on the same page is critical)
  • No more than one early breakfast meeting and evening meeting per week (e.g. networking event or professional meeting)
  • Have dinner with the kid(s) at least five nights per week
  • No more than five business days of travel per quarter (some jobs make this difficult to achieve)
  • One week of vacation for the entire family per quarter (must go out of town)
  • Hold a weekly date night and leave the kid(s) with a babysitter

Developing a rhythm like this results in clear expectations…

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Ad agency, Cramer-Krasselt resigns Panera Bread in rare public display of acrimony.


Gods of Advertising

6556495-687641-mold-on-bread-mouldy-bread-isolated-on-a-white-background
Getting treated like shit gets old…

I got an inordinate amount of traction from a link I shared on Facebook about a leaked memo from Cramer-Krasselt’s Chief Executive, Peter Krivkovich, regarding his agency’s resignation of the Panera Bread account. Claiming the client was “much too much even in this crazy business” what with “the constant last-minute shifts in direction, the behind-the-scenes politics, the enormous level of subjectivity that disregards proof of performance…” Well, it got to the point where “enough was enough.” Here is the story: http://adage.com/article/agency-news/cramer-krasselt-panera-part-ways/293668/

Wow.

Inside an agency comments like these are often voiced but they are seldom put on paper and distributed. Even rarer is resigning an account. Here we are privy to both events. And while the matter is basically none of our business, it hits home. Why? Well, first off agencies don’t resign business because for most of us winning it is so damn…

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Love Buzz


My Blog Can Beat Up Your Blog

For the past few days, I’ve read dozens of posts about fathers, mostly written by women, and it has made me wonder; in a few years if my three girls wrote about me, what would they say?

I became a father 11 days before my 33rd birthday, now a few months shy of my 44th, I’m responsible for 3 girls, 18, 10, and 9 and still learning on the job.

I never planned to have children. I was the oldest of two growing up, hated having so much responsibility thrust upon me at an early age, and by the time I was out on my own, I pursued as many distractions, mostly bad, from making sure another life form needed me. I coached a Little League team once, worked with the Big Brothers organization briefly, and tolerated other people’s kids with a decent but distant nature.

In early 2003, despite a…

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Finding a Rhythm as an Entrepreneur With a Family


David Cummings on Startups

Several weeks ago a young professional that wants to be an entrepreneur approached me for advice about being an entrepreneur and having a family. He had just had his first child and was looking for ideas. Having spent time thinking through this I offered up a fews ideas:

  • Write down a set of rules and guidelines and share them with your spouse (getting everyone on the same page is critical)
  • No more than one early breakfast meeting and evening meeting per week (e.g. networking event or professional meeting)
  • Have dinner with the kid(s) at least five nights per week
  • No more than five business days of travel per quarter (some jobs make this difficult to achieve)
  • One week of vacation for the entire family per quarter (must go out of town)
  • Hold a weekly date night and leave the kid(s) with a babysitter

Developing a rhythm like this results in clear expectations…

View original post 34 more words

Imagining the Black Suburbs: Homogeneity and African American Suburbia


Archaeology and Material Culture

levey family The Levey family posed in front of a Levittown home in New York in 1949.

The postwar suburb seems painted in our collective imagination as a White nuclear family standing proudly in front of a standardized tract home and a chrome-accented American car.  Fortunately a rich scholarship on postwar suburbia has complicated or utterly unraveled that and many other suburban stereotypes, underscoring the material, social, and historical diversity of suburban landscapes: we know suburbia included a multitude of architectural forms beyond the interchangeable Levittown box; the roots of the suburbs reach well into the 19th century; working-class families predominated; and we are paying increasingly more attention to the suburban experience along the color line.

Henry Greer advertised his Northwest Street liquor store in December 1935. Henry Greer advertised his Northwest Street liquor store in December 1935.

In 1947 Henry and Della Greer were among Indianapolis, Indiana’s first African-American suburbanites, and in many ways the story of the Greers and their neighbors…

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I don’t wanna be an advocate…


Rochelle Karina ... love, life, & laughter

I don’t want to be an advocate. I did not sign up for this. And frankly, I’d much rather just quietly deal with whatever issues I need to deal with and move on. It’s not that I don’t think it’s necessary, it’s just that I really don’t want the job falling on my shoulders.

Maybe I don’t want to because I don’t want to admit I need help. Or because I’m still struggling with the classic stigma. Or… whatever. The fact is, it’s frustrating to be in a constant state of battling for things others take for granted.

Out at a restaurant – I’m sorry, we would prefer a booth against a wall instead of the open table in the middle of the room, thank you.

To lots of people – Please repeat that a little more slowly (followed by whatever other details, information seems appropriate).
And… I’m sorry, can you…

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10 Key Insights on Startups from Brian Watson


David Cummings on Startups

Brian Watson, an associate at venture firm Union Square Ventures, just put up a great post called Post Money Evaluations about his two year experience working one of the tops firms in the country. Here are 10 key insights on startups from his post:

  1. VC is about story recognition. Remember the anecdotes (and how they’re resolved), because history often repeats itself.
  2. Raising money is a trade-off between valuation and control.
  3. Your reputation is everything. Only make an investment if you are committed for the long term.
  4. Operating a company is a balance between doing the right thing (strategy) and doing it right (execution).
  5. Good company culture is when the team feels accountable to each other, implicitly and explicitly.
  6. Being selective — doing less—keeps you focused.
  7. Once you have a core product, the goals should be growth, monetization, and happiness.
  8. When you’re interviewing someone, ask what they don’t/didn’t like…

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